Would You Get a COVID Vaccine if it was Tied to a $1,500 Stimulus Check?

At the time of this writing, Congress had still not agreed to a badly needed COVID-19 relief bill – and while one is seemingly increasingly becoming more possible by the day, all indications are that it will be a “skinny” bill and not distribute the type of aid that the CARES Act did when it was passed in the early days of the pandemic last spring. In other words, it likely won’t distribute stimulus checks to the millions of Americans that were privy to receiving them months ago.

As a result of the activity – or lack of activity if you look at it that way – in Congress, it’s leading many to wonder if it would be wise to tie in the next stimulus check to getting the forthcoming COVID-19 vaccine in an effort to immunize more Americans and reach that magic 70-75 percent herd immunity benchmark that so many epidemiologists have targeted.

While scientific polls indicate that an increasing number of Americans plan to get the vaccine once it’s available to the general public, there is still a fair amount of resistance to vaccinations in general over a newfound distrust in science or concern over how new the vaccine is. Paying people to receive the vaccine would essentially incentivize Americans to help put an end to the pandemic.

Perhaps the most notable backer behind this proposal is former Maryland Congressman John Delaney, who wants to reward Americans with $1,500 to receive the vaccine. In a recent interview with CNBC, he said that his main motivation behind promoting this concept is very simple: It puts COVID-19 in the rearview mirror faster and allows all Americans to get back to their lives. When the vaccines become available to the general public, it’s worth noting that it will be administered free of charge to Americans who want to receive it. But even a free vaccine may not be enough for many Americans due to the reasons that we mentioned above.

Specifically, Delaney’s plan is to present those who have been vaccinated with ID numbers following immunization, which they can then plug into a website along with their social security number to register to receive their stimulus checks. Delaney noted that paying people to get immunized isn’t unlike how rewards are offered in other countries. However, if Americans were to take the vaccine under this proposal, it would cost the government some $380 billion. It’s a lot of money, but the benefits could be worth it. One, immunization will help end the pandemic and also help end other forms of relief that the government is providing or considering. And two, you’re giving Americans money to infuse into a recovering economy.

Challenges are certainly there, but it begs the question: If you’re on the fence or in the “no vaccine” camp, would a $1,500 check help change your mind?

22 thoughts on “Would You Get a COVID Vaccine if it was Tied to a $1,500 Stimulus Check?”

    1. Let him and the rest of the traders in Washington pay for it out of their personal overpaid paycheck, i their serious. The proof of how serious this joker is he resonce.

    2. People need to put their faith in Christ before its to late. Current events and future events are laid out in the Bible. Maybe people will be willing to hear the truth now. Look at the end times predicted in the Bible and work backwords and everything becomes clear. Our creator is awesome, why not put your faith in Him and become a part of something great. Dont let the truth be stolen from you.

  1. No! My beliefs, my morality, my character are not for sale, at any price. The creators of COVID-19, and the COVID vaccine are evil, and I don’t trust them.

    1. I agree with you Bill. My faith, conscious, morality, are not for sale at any price. I truly believe there is evil behind the making of the vaccine and evil wants to destroy us all. No one is taking my mind away, only my God.

  2. Why would a $1500 Stimulus check be offered to take the vaccine when the government is going to give us a $1200,00 check without the shot?
    I believe that most americans will take the vaccine without the money but would that $1500 be extra and we also get the $1200 check?
    Robert

  3. I’ve had covid in both lungs and if you will kiss my ass on TV and all networks cover it and broadcast it and then give up half of you yearly paid then I still won’t take your fucking shot period oh my name is James Morris so you sheep will know me

  4. You got to kidding me! You can’t pay me any amount, to take that stupid shot! First I put my TRUST in OUR LORD JESUS! Second, you would have to take 2 shots and with each shot, (side effect) YOU will be sick 2-3 days, which is 4-6 days downtime. And it only has a survival rate of 90%. But without the shot, and if you get covid-19, the survival rate is 99.8%! THINK!!!!

  5. The vaccine against the “virus” which has not been isolated yet and which they test for with a test that does not test for the “virus” according to the inventor Kary Mullis who “died” in August of pneumonia…
    Folks, COVID-19 is a HOAX to lure you into the vaccine which will turn you into AI connected biological robots to be “switched out” upon “press delete”.
    If I would take the vaccine for $1500? No thanks! Not for all the money in the world!

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